About

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This site is published by Jason Murphy, a Melbourne-based economist.

I have worked at the Australian Treasury, the Ministry of Finance of the Republic of Nauru, and the Australian Financial Review.

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I can be found on LinkedIn and Twitter.

MEDIA REQUESTS

I am open to media invitations to discuss economic and business issues. I am an experienced commentator on TV news, panel shows and ABC’s Lateline.

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I have also been a frequent guest on ABC Radio, the BBC World Service, commercial radio and community radio. Please contact me via twitter or email: jasemurphy@gmail.com.

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EVENTS

I have experience as a panel member at public events and am an acclaimed MC and compere.

FREELANCE WORK

I work as a freelance writer (commercial and journalism work). I have experience in news, opinion, features, major public reports for private and public sectors, press releases and blog posts. My rates are competitive and I am highly responsive. Please get in touch.

THIS BLOG

It began in 2009 as a project with James Cleaver. It went on hiatus from 2010 to 2013 while I worked at the AFR and is now back, much more focused on economics. I post intermittently these days.

It is not designed just for people with economics PhDs. It is for smart people of all stripes. I welcome your views on anything posted – please leave a comment!

26 thoughts on “About”

  1. Bravo. I expect to see some stinging and perceptive commentary comparing Melbourne and San Francisco. And you are truly Melbournian/San Franciscan, you’ll consider yourselves qualified to compare Sydney and Los Angeles as well!

    cheers, jarrett

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  2. Little request. Are you able to add an RSS feed link to your site – I’d find this much better than email notifications. Have enjoyed your musings.

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  3. So blogs come and go, but it seems really odd for a group blog to die without so much as a goodbye. So, goodbye to you.

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    1. Good point. I’ve put up a post that provides some sort of explanation.

      Thanks for all your reading and comments.

      Instead of goodbye I’d like to say a bientot

      (You can now look out for me in the paper. (the smallest, most widely distributed one. ))

      TTTE

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  4. Here are some good topics for you blog on:
    – what will be the ultimate outcome of continuous competitive devaluation of currencies?
    – when the AU dollar was high why didn’t all aussie property owners take out reverse mortgages in US dollars? Or did the banks effectively do that on their behalf? Or why didn’t the banks do that?
    – has the RBA got any of the $80b+ that Joe Hockey donated to them left?
    – is currency devaluation the only tool for a weak and uninspired government?
    – good apples have been selling for under $NZ1/kg in NZ. Why are similar aussie apples still selling for $7/kg or more?
    – is the lack of foreign bananas in australia simply protectionism (with bogus excuse of disease control)?
    – how can australia hope to have a robust economy when protectionism means that no aussie bananas are ever going to be exported because they will always be overpriced?
    – is the RBA too politicised and not independent enough?

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  5. Hi
    I just read your article on News.com.au “Five reasons the only smart reaction to a housing crash is fear”. Interesting read, thanks for writing it.

    But, and there’s always a but, is there any chance that someone can write an article on what we could be doing, as a nation, state, business, family or individual to try to lessen the impact of a big, bad property crash. If not from a national or state level, but at least some handy tips to help families and individuals out there.

    Do we spend more? Do we save more? Do we jam our head in the sand and pretend that it isn’t going to happen?

    So many articles are written about how devastating it’s going to be, but none actually provide useful tips on what could be done to avoid or at least soften the blow.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good question. I think part of the problem is the policies that cushion a fall are the same ones that support a bubble – low interest rates, strong government spending. It’s something of a paradox.

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  6. So, taking policies, government and other things that are out of our control from the picture, is it just as simple as reducing personal debt and increasing personal savings/safety nets to soften the blow on an individual basis?

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    1. In a Macro sense, yes. Individually, people mifht consider investing in things that perform well in a recession, like discount stores; or taking a government job

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  7. Re your article on news.com – 30 Dec 2015 – you should probably do a bit of research before you publish and take a look at Forever New and Cotton On … Two Australian brands that have more stores outside of Aussie than in … Great success stories. Australian retail is more than Myers, DJs, Coles & Woolies … Read up, mate.

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  8. RE your article on petrol price competition (lack of). I believe a major problem in general is lack of openness on business ownership. In Garden City shopping Center (Perth) there are three places people can get their nails done – different names but ‘rumoured’ to be all owned by the same family. If so, why would they compete on price? Also ‘rumoured’, Garden City charge rents linked to shop turnover. If so, why would they want to see real competition. Unfortunately difficult for ordinary people to ascertain the facts of such ‘rumours’. Regards, Don.

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  9. Hi Jason, Interested to read your article in news.com.au about the services industry and what a good substitute for manufacturing it is.

    I work in the mining industry as an engineer and over the past few years I’ve watched first IT, then human resources, then accounting all get outsourced to India.

    You specifically mentioned engineering in your article. Right now, I’m working on a site which is building one of the largest mine expansions in Australia at the moment.

    All the detailed engineering for that project is being done in India, with only a high-level project team in Australia.

    My question for you is: What services can’t ultimately be outsourced to India, and why don’t economists consider this issue in more detail when praising the service economy?

    I’ve love to see this perspective addressed in one of your articles in the future, as I think it is one of the major blind spots in the debate at the moment.

    Regards,

    Richard

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    1. Hi Richard

      I think the answer is many services can be outsourced. No doubt about it. They can be and will be.

      But if the economy is goods and services, goods are even easier to source from overseas. We import a HUGE amount of materials and merchandise.

      It is much easier to produce goods offshore to a high quality using machines, systems, and quality checking. Services tend to be produced using fallible people, and are often produced in real time meaning quality checking can’t happen before they are consumed. All this means we should be able to compete better on services than goods.

      Thanks a lot for your comment!

      Like

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